Libraries' News, Events, Exhibits http://www.lib.usm.edu//news.rss.html en 120 Special Collections Displays Student Curated Exhibits http://www.lib.usm.edu//about_us/news/student_curated_exhibits.html University Libraries’ Special Collections at Southern Miss is hosting an exhibit opening April 25 from 4 – 5 p.m. in McCain Library room 305 to highlight three exhibits curated by Southern Miss students.

Special Collections created an exhibits program that allows students opportunities to curate mini-exhibits, featuring materials from the Libraries’ collections. Students learn how to select items for display, install the materials, write label and exhibit text, and how to publicize the exhibit. This year’s exhibits feature the work of two undergraduate history majors and an English doctoral student.

Looking Back: The Fight, the Contributions, the Devastation that lead to Northern Victory, curated by sophomore history major Anna Morgan, looks back on the victory of the North in the Civil War. Using books, diaries, and pictures, Looking Back takes the audience through the Civil War and explains who contributed to the Northern victory. Looking Back also gives an idea of the camp life of Northern soldiers, and their experiences of fighting alongside men they might never see again.

Legends and Folklore of Mississippi and the Gulf Coast, curated by history undergraduate student Dale E. Autry, explores some of the stranger stories and tales originating in the Gulf Coast and Mississippi River region. These stories, whether real or imagined, often become part of the local tradition and at times even enter the popular culture of their time. Though easily dismissed by most, these stories and myths have nonetheless affected the lives of many people, and at the very least, make for entertaining reading.

From Typescript to Hardcover, curated by Center for Writers doctoral student Sara A. Lewis, showcases the process of editing a manuscript for publication. A handwritten note among Ezra Jack Keats’s papers in which he claims the process of publishing a book “is pretty much of a mystery to most people” inspired this exhibit. In an effort to demystify this process, edited sections of John Green’s Paper Towns, Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time, and Episode 333 of Saturday Night Live are on display, tracking the development of these projects from the draft stage to the final product.

These exhibits will be on display on the third floor of McCain Library and Archives through February 2018. If you have questions about the program or the exhibits on display, contact Jennifer Brannock at Jennifer.Brannock@usm.edu or 601.266.4347. 

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Thu, 13 Apr 2017 09:20:45 -0500 http://www.lib.usm.edu//about_us/news/student_curated_exhibits.html Dawn Smith <dawn.smith@usm.edu>
Dr. David R. Davies to Present Lecture on the First Newspapers in Mississippi http://www.lib.usm.edu//about_us/news/first_newspapers_in_mississippi.html Dr. David R. Davies, director of the School of Mass Communication and Journalism, will deliver a talk about the pioneering printers and newspapers in the Mississippi Territory on April 20 at 6:30 p.m. in the Cook Library Art Gallery. This event is part of “Lectures, Lore and Lessons: Mississippi at the Bicentennial,” an event and lecture series celebrating Mississippi’s bicentennial, hosted by The University of Southern Mississippi University Libraries’ Special Collections.

In his talk, Davies will discuss how historians have generally ignored the early Mississippi press, even though state histories of early printers and newspapers can provide valuable insights into the unique circumstances of press development on the frontier. He will also explore the unique circumstances of press development in the Mississippi Territory, particularly the territory’s pioneering printers and newspapers and their political entanglements.

Davies, the former dean of the University’s Honors College, teaches media history in the School of Mass Communication and Journalism. His research specialties are the press and the Civil Rights Movements and trends in American newspapers since World War II. He is the author of two books, The Press and Race: Mississippi Journalists Confront the Movement and The Postwar Decline of American Newspapers.

He is a graduate of the Kiplinger Program in Public Affairs Reporting at Ohio State University, where he earned a master’s degree in journalism. He also holds a master’s degree in American History from Southern Miss and a Ph.d. in mass communication specializing in media history from the University of Alabama. Before entering academia, he was a reporter in Arkansas, working for both the Arkansas Democrat and the Arkansas Gazette.

For more information about, contact Jennifer Brannock at 601.266.4347 or Jennifer.Brannock@usm.edu.  To view a list of upcoming events relating to Mississippi’s Bicentennial, visit http://lib.usm.edu/about_us/news/msbicentennial.html

This lecture was made possible by a grant from the Mississippi Humanities Council, through support from the Mississippi Development Authority.

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Tue, 11 Apr 2017 10:12:02 -0500 http://www.lib.usm.edu//about_us/news/first_newspapers_in_mississippi.html Dawn Smith <dawn.smith@usm.edu>
Local Artist Exhibits Figure Paintings in the Cook Library Art Gallery http://www.lib.usm.edu//about_us/news/mccroy_exhibit.html Paintings by Hattiesburg based artist, James Kyle McCrory, are currently on display in the Cook Library Art Gallery from March 20 through the end of the spring semester. The public is invited to attend a reception with the artist on April 10 from 4 – 6 p.m. in the gallery.

McCrory graduated from The University of Southern Mississippi in 2013 and proceeded to pursue work in Chicago before relocating back to Mississippi. He has a studio in downtown Hattiesburg and currently works with the Hattiesburg Downtown Association of the Fine Arts.

McCrory uses oil on canvas to create his figure paintings. “The human body as a landscape has always had a profound impact on man’s imagination. Throughout art history the human body has proven to be more than just an object to replicate; it is an ideal to aspire towards. In the modern age the depiction of the human form has become far more impactful when focusing on a psychological response rather than a solely literal representation of the anatomical figure. It is due to this that my work rarely strays away from the human form,” says McCrory of his work.

The exhibit will be open through the end of the semester. For more information, visit http://jameskylemccrory.weebly.comor contact jmccrory1990@yahoo.com

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Mon, 27 Mar 2017 10:56:57 -0500 http://www.lib.usm.edu//about_us/news/mccroy_exhibit.html Dawn Smith <dawn.smith@usm.edu>
Mississippi State Senator Willie Simmons among Panelists to speak at USM Criminal Justice Forum http://www.lib.usm.edu//about_us/news/parchment_exhibit.html Mississippi State Senator Willie Simmons will join other panelists Thursday, March 30, at a Justice in the Mississippi State Penitentiary: Past Reflections, Present Challenges and Future Directions.   The forum, to be moderated by Alan Thompson, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice will address current conditions in the state’s prisons and efforts to reduce crime and recidivism. Panelists are: Willie Simmons, Mississippi State Senator; Leonard Vincent, Mississippi Department of Corrections (MDOC) General Counsel; Dilworth Ricks, MDOC Victim Services director and R. Kim Rushing, author of Parchman. The family of former Superintendent Wiggins will also be in attendance. The Forum will be held in the International Center building auditorium, Rm 101 from 6 pm – 7:15 pm. 

The following morning, student and other volunteers will gather in the Cook library art gallery to for a reading and book-signing by R. Kim Rushing, author of the recent photography book on Parchman. There will also be readings of inmate letters and excerpts from Louis Bourgeois, Unit 30: New Writing from Parchman Farm, a recent collection of prison writing from Vox's Prison Writes Initiative (PWI) as well as a synopsis of victims’ letters presented by Dilworth Ricks. After the readings, volunteers will package the books that have been donated to Big House Books over the last month to mail to inmates in the Mississippi penitentiary system. The event will be held March 31, 10am.

These events conclude the exhibition currently installed at USM’s Cook library on the history of Parchman.

All events are free and open to the publicThis official bicentennial project was made possible by a grant from the Mississippi Humanities Council, through support from the Mississippi Development Authority.

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Thu, 09 Mar 2017 15:38:45 -0600 http://www.lib.usm.edu//about_us/news/parchment_exhibit.html Dawn Smith <dawn.smith@usm.edu>
Mississippi painter Kate Freeman Clark subject of lecture by author Carolyn Brown http://www.lib.usm.edu//about_us/news/carolyn_brown_lecture.html Award-winning author Carolyn Brown of Jackson, Miss. will discuss her new book, The Artist’s Sketch: A Biography of Painter Kate Freeman Clark, on Friday, March 24 at 5:30 pm at Oddfellows Gallery in downtown Hattiesburg. This event is part of “Lectures, Lore and Lessons: Mississippi at the Bicentennial,” an event and lecture series celebrating Mississippi’s bicentennial, hosted by The University of Southern Mississippi University Libraries’ Special Collections.

Clark is one of Mississippi’s most significant artists, and The Artist’s Sketch: A Biography of Painter Kate Freeman Clark gives insight into her life and work. Paintings by Kate Freeman Clark from the William Carey University Collection will be on view in the gallery the evening of the lecture.

As a young woman, Clark enrolled in the Art Students League in New York to study under many great artists of the day, most notably William Merritt Chase. For six consecutive summers, she attended his Shinnecock Summer School in Long Island, where she mastered the plein air technique.  Chase considered Clark his “most talented pupil.”

Upon returning to her home in Holly Springs, Miss. in 1923, Clark abandoned painting.  It was not until after her death in 1957 that the town of Holly Springs learned about her life and painting career in New York. Clark left all of her art, which had been stored for 40 years in a warehouse in New York, to the town of Holly Springs.  She also bequeathed her family home and some money to be used in developing a museum. 

Brown spent months in Holly Springs researching the Kate Freeman Clark archive. An Artist’s Sketch highlights Clark’s life through primary sources and enlightens readers about the significance of her work.  She is also the author of two previous award-winning biographies: A Daring Life: A Biography of Eudora Welty and Song of My Life: A Biography of Margaret Walker, both published by University Press of Mississippi. Visit www.carolynjbrown.net to learn more.

This official bicentennial project was made possible by a grant from the Mississippi Humanities Council, through support from the Mississippi Development Authority. To learn more about “Lectures, Lore and Lessons: Mississippi at the Bicentennial” events and lecture series, visit http://lib.usm.edu/about_us/news/msbicentennial.html.

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Thu, 09 Mar 2017 09:22:21 -0600 http://www.lib.usm.edu//about_us/news/carolyn_brown_lecture.html Dawn Smith <dawn.smith@usm.edu>