de Grummond Collection

McCain Library and Archives
University Libraries
University of Southern Mississippi



CAROL RYRIE BRINK PAPERS

Collection Number
Collection Dates
Collection Volume
DG0118
1968-1972
.25 cu.ft. (1 box)

Biographical Sketch | Scope & Content | Related Collections | Series & Subseries | Box Inventory

Provenance

Material received from Carol Ryrie Brink during 1972 and 1973.

Restrictions

Noncirculating; available for research.

Copyright

This collection is protected by the Copyright Law of the United States (Title 17, U. S. Code). Reproductions can be made only if they are to be used for "private study, scholarship, or research." It is the user's responsibility to verify copyright ownership, and to obtain all necessary permissions prior to the reproduction, publication, or other use of any portion of these materials, other than that noted above.


Biographical Sketch

Born on December 28, 1895 in Moscow, Idaho, Carol Ryrie Brink attended the University of Idaho (1914-1917) and received the Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California Berkeley (1918). Soon thereafter she married Raymond Brink, a mathematician at the University of Minnesota. In 1965 Brink was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Literature from the University of Idaho. She died August 15, 1981.

Orphaned at a very young age, Brink desired to be a writer from an early age. This desire was nurtured by her aunt and grandmother, who were both excellent storytellers. Her most famous book, Caddie Woodlawn (1935), is based on a story she heard often as she was growing up. It is the story of the Wisconsin childhood of her grandmother Caddie.

After publishing her first book in 1934, Brink wrote more than thirty fiction and nonfiction books for children and adults, as well as several plays. She received the Newbery Award in 1936 and the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1959 for Caddie Woodlawn. Brink won the Friends of American Writers Award in 1956 for The Headland and the Irvin Kerlan Award in 1978 for Four Girls on a Homestead.

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